Preschoolers and Pre-Math

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Numbers” by Clker-Free-Vector-Images is licensed under CC by 2.0

Did you know that the basic math we introduce our preschoolers to has a corresponding name of its own? It is known as ‘pre-math’. Pre-math refers to  introductory math, such as counting numbers from 1 to 10, learning to differentiate between the sizes (big and small) of similar shapes, determining which number comes before/after another and also being able to pronounce the number names correctly.

I recently came across the results of a study published in the Journal of Experimental and Child Psychology, which evaluated the math skills of 112 preschool kids ranging between the ages of 3-5 years. The difference in their math skill set upon entering and leaving preschool was studied and psychologist Dave Geary had this to say:

“What we found was that kids who were a little bit delayed in the learning of the meaning of these number words really weren’t very fluent at processing numbers when they hit kindergarten.”

To put it in a nutshell, there was higher probability of preschoolers doing well in math if they entered kindergarten after grasping two basic concepts – words that are associated with numbers along with the quantities they represent. For instance, the term ‘two’ would mean a pair of things, such as their shoes. The key here is to begin with very few items so that preschoolers comprehend numbers easily; for instance, according to Geary:

“So you start with one and you add one more – how many is that? Or you start with three and you take away two, how many is that?”

Sounds pretty straightforward? Well, it may or may not be, depending on the attention span of your preschooler. In the following weeks, let’s talk about fun ways to introduce preschoolers to ‘pre-math’.

Teaching Preschoolers Basic Table Manners

The words ‘preschooler’ and ‘messy’ are synonymous with each other, especially when it comes to the dining table. Kids love getting their hands (and feet and arms and face and everything else) messy and gooey. However, there are some basic table manners which they can be reminded of time and again from an early age.

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Child” by speaknow is licensed under CC by 2.0

According to parenting coach Lisa Bunnage, “Toddlers need constant reminding to behave. It’s all a game to little ones, so it’s up to parents to set the mealtimes rules right from the start.”

It could begin by washing hands alongside them before coming to the dining table. If kids observe you doing it before every meal, they’ll do it too. Next comes using words like ‘Please’ and ‘Thank you’. For instance, ‘Ketchup’ from them should not elicit a response from you, except for a gentle reminder to put it like ‘Please pass me the ketchup’ followed by a ‘Thank you’. Needless to say, it will take considerable prodding and reinforcing efforts on your part but eventually they’ll get used to talking a particular way.

Slightly older kids should be taught to help in clearing the table after a meal. Even if they aren’t tall enough to reach up to the kitchen counter, they could simply carry the dirty plates to the sink and hand them over to an adult. Lastly, washing hands after a meal needs to be emphasized the same way as before beginning a meal.

The key is to set realistic expectations and gently remind them about their table manners at each mealtime. Preschoolers are avid observers and fast learners; in no time, they’ll be perfect little gentlemen and gentlewomen with regard to table etiquette!

May Day Flower Crafts for Preschoolers

May Day has always been synonymous with the spring season. Legend has it that in olden times, children used to dance in the moonlit woods a day before May Day to celebrate the onset of spring. Why not let your preschooler have some fun with some spring crafts to celebrate the season of sun and daisies?

Flower Crown

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Summer Crown” by Katia_M is licensed under CC by 2.0

This activity can be carried out both with real as well as artificial flowers, the former being preferable (and prettier too). Here’s how you go about it: To measure the circumference of your child’s head, wrap a piece of twine around once (not too tight), add about two and a half inches to the length measured and doubling the twine over once, tie a tight knot to it.

Now ask your little one to pick the flowers of her choice from the garden; it’ll be perfect if you have relatively small flowers in white or pink or even yellow – any color would do though. Or else, bigger flowers with stalks would be easy to work with. Simply overlap the stalks with each other such that they are each an inch ahead of the one previous to it and tie them up to the twine/wire. Ask your child whether she wants to have just one color or many colors. And then all you’ve got to do is watch with glee as she preens like a fairy princess in front of the mirror!

Flower Mask

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Cartoon” by OpenClipart-Vectors is licensed under CC by 2.0

Back in my childhood days, I remember I participated in a school play once. Participated as in I was supposed to be a tree. I recall being thrilled at the prospect of standing right at the back of the stage with my nose and cheeks painted brown to merge in with the brown of the tree trunk made from cardboard, with green foliage as my cap. Not sure why exactly I was so ecstatic with such a nondescript part, but I guess the fascination of simply standing on the school stage in front of a large audience was one of the factors responsible for the grin plastered on my face throughout.

Cut to the present. I’m sure your preschoolers would be thrilled to bits too, if you suggested them enacting the part of, say, a sunflower or a daisy and prancing around in their ‘costume’. You’ll require some big pieces of cardboard; opened out cereal boxes should work well. Put a small quarter plate upside down over it and trace it with a pencil. Now place a larger plate upside down using the same center and trace another bigger circle outside the one drawn earlier, such that you’ve traced out a shape akin to that of a doughnut. Cut out the center carefully. Ask your little one to trace out flower petals (of the corresponding size) from the cardboard too. You could stick white paper over the cut-out petals and allow your children to color them in their favorite shades. Now, all you’ve got to do is glue the petals a tad symmetrically around the edge of your cut-out circle (here’s an easy tutorial demonstrating how it is done). For the finishing touch, either add a cardboard green-colored stalk at the bottom which the child can hold while poking their face through the center of the flower or else attach a ribbon on both sides to be tied at the back of the head. Done!

Help your kids create something beautiful this May Day!